Tigaer Inc.

Tigaer Inc. Tigaer Inc.
0 76.936638

no images yet

SHARE WITH OTHERS
See new updates

Tigaer Inc.

Latest Updates

Hands on review: YU YUREKA

For Rs 9000, it is one hell of a deal. 5.5" 720p IPS display with a 178° viewing angle, protected by Corning gorilla glass 3. It houses the snapdragon 615 gen 1(more on this later). A 2500mah battery provides juice.

Screen and display: the 720p unit is wonderful. No problems encountered as of yet. Touch input is precise. All said and done , this display is fit even for those rs 25000 upper mid range phones. Gorilla glass 3 is wonderful as well. A brief search on YouTube will yield a scratch test of the yureka in which a person tries to scratch the screen using a key , knife and other household items. The yureka cones out of it with no scratches at all. So using a screen guard is up to you.
10/10

Build: I would say that for a phone priced as low as this, build quality is excellent. Not your usual micromax crap. Its all plastic with a matte grey texture and finish on the back cover which adds a sort of premium feel to it.
The proximity sensor is an issue though. Micromax have slapped on a very basic sensor with 5.0 cm and 0cm as the only two profiles on it. And after upgrading to lollipop it stopped working entirely. Putting a piece of paper under the back cover seemed to do the trick and is now functional
6/10( -2 for the sensor issue and quality)

Performance: One would expect blistering fast performance off an 8 - corr processor. It is not the case here. You see, the snapdragon 615 is a dual quad setup on qualcomm's big.LITTLE technology. It's not even a conventional setup it's usually a better processor for high end tasks and and an efficient one for the lower end tasks. The cortex a53 which is basically a pimped out cortex a7( which is ancient btw) usually makes for the little part of the big.LITTLE configuration. This processor contains dual quad clusters of cortex a53 at different clock speeds. Its basically an entry level processor on steroids. Geekbench 3 gives 674 on single core and 2308 on multicore. Antutu posts 32k

But that's all on paper. Day to day tasks are met with ease. Gaming performance is very good as well. Asphalt 8 can be played with everything set to high and encounter little to no lag at all. GTA:SA on the other hand tells you a different story. There are fps drops in 50% resolution and everything set to min/off. So there's that. The adreno 405 (the GPU) may have better software than the 300 series GPUs but it's performance is on the lower side.

The phone heats up quite a lot as well. 5 mins of GTA :SA the top part of the display ( where the processor is housed touches around 60°) so pray to god that you don't get a call while you are playing as the speakerphone is right opposite to the processors.
8/10

Battery: If there is something that's actually below par with this device, it has got to be the battery. 2500mah, but in real usage it is more like 1500. 5 mins of screen on time and 2-3% of total charge will vanish just like that. It has got to do with some bad processor management. All the 8 cores are active all the time. Not only is that overkill, it is battery intensive as well. Let's hope the guys at cyanogen does something about it.

Speaking of cyanogen,
Software: android 5 based cm12s (64bit) has rolled out to as an OTA to all the yureka units. Anyone who is familiar will find themselves right at home, and then some. There were a lot of customizations on the 4.4.4 version but in lollipop a lot of these have been taken out. But fret not as these will make an appearance in the coming months(regular monthly updates are guaranteed). But if you really like how the selection of themes available , it is highly suggested to postpone upgrading to lollipop until June/July.
8/10 ( -2 for lack of customizations in 5.0.1)

Conclusion: THE phone to buy in the lower mid range section( if you can get past the sensor thing that is).

Overall: 8/10

~steam

   Over a month ago
SEND

Hands on review: YU YUREKA

For Rs 9000, it is one hell of a deal. 5.5" 720p IPS display with a 178° viewing angle, protected by Corning gorilla glass 3. It houses the snapdragon 615 gen 1(more on this later). A 2500mah battery provides juice.

Screen and display: the 720p unit is wonderful. No problems encountered as of yet. Touch input is precise. All said and done , this display is fit even for those rs 25000 upper mid range phones. Gorilla glass 3 is wonderful as well. A brief search on YouTube will yield a scratch test of the yureka in which a person tries to scratch the screen using a key , knife and other household items. The yureka cones out of it with no scratches at all. So using a screen guard is up to you.
10/10

Build: I would say that for a phone priced as low as this, build quality is excellent. Not your usual micromax crap. Its all plastic with a matte grey texture and finish on the back cover which adds a sort of premium feel to it.
The proximity sensor is an issue though. Micromax have slapped on a very basic sensor with 5.0 cm and 0cm as the only two profiles on it. And after upgrading to lollipop it stopped working entirely. Putting a piece of paper under the back cover seemed to do the trick and is now functional
6/10( -2 for the sensor issue and quality)

Performance: One would expect blistering fast performance off an 8 - corr processor. It is not the case here. You see, the snapdragon 615 is a dual quad setup on qualcomm's big.LITTLE technology. It's not even a conventional setup it's usually a better processor for high end tasks and and an efficient one for the lower end tasks. The cortex a53 which is basically a pimped out cortex a7( which is ancient btw) usually makes for the little part of the big.LITTLE configuration. This processor contains dual quad clusters of cortex a53 at different clock speeds. Its basically an entry level processor on steroids. Geekbench 3 gives 674 on single core and 2308 on multicore. Antutu posts 32k

But that's all on paper. Day to day tasks are met with ease. Gaming performance is very good as well. Asphalt 8 can be played with everything set to high and encounter little to no lag at all. GTA:SA on the other hand tells you a different story. There are fps drops in 50% resolution and everything set to min/off. So there's that. The adreno 405 (the GPU) may have better software than the 300 series GPUs but it's performance is on the lower side.

The phone heats up quite a lot as well. 5 mins of GTA :SA the top part of the display ( where the processor is housed touches around 60°) so pray to god that you don't get a call while you are playing as the speakerphone is right opposite to the processors.
8/10

Battery: If there is something that's actually below par with this device, it has got to be the battery. 2500mah, but in real usage it is more like 1500. 5 mins of screen on time and 2-3% of total charge will vanish just like that. It has got to do with some bad processor management. All the 8 cores are active all the time. Not only is that overkill, it is battery intensive as well. Let's hope the guys at cyanogen does something about it.

Speaking of cyanogen,
Software: android 5 based cm12s (64bit) has rolled out to as an OTA to all the yureka units. Anyone who is familiar will find themselves right at home, and then some. There were a lot of customizations on the 4.4.4 version but in lollipop a lot of these have been taken out. But fret not as these will make an appearance in the coming months(regular monthly updates are guaranteed). But if you really like how the selection of themes available , it is highly suggested to postpone upgrading to lollipop until June/July.
8/10 ( -2 for lack of customizations in 5.0.1)

Conclusion: THE phone to buy in the lower mid range section( if you can get past the sensor thing that is).

Overall: 8/10

~steam

   Over a month ago
SEND

The original Moto X, which debuted last year, was a different breed of smartphone. Rather than trying to build a beast with the best screen and the most horsepower, Motorola focused on the user experience above all else. The result was a phone that was so intelligent and comfortable to use that it almost didn't matter that it was out-gunned in a lot of ways. Well, the 2014 model is here. Not only does it retain that same sublime user experience, it comes out guns blazing.
The first generation Moto X did not have the highest end specs, yet the software experiences made it a compelling device that I continue to use today. Thankfully, the new Moto X has specs comparable to the other flagships while also offering fantastic software experiences.

The first thing you will notice is that the new Moto X grew up in size and now sports a 5.2 inch 1080p display. Motorola did an excellent job in keeping the bezels small so this 5.2 inch display comes with a width the same as the 5-inch Samsung Galaxy S5. Motorola also has reasonable top and bottom bezels so that the length is 140.8 mm, 2 mm shorter than the S5 and about 6 mm shorter than the One M8.

If you pick up a white version of the Moto X you will likely notice three small openings around the display, reminiscent of the IR sensors on the Kindle Fire phone. There is also a fourth in the upper-left corner that is located within an existing opening for other sensors. Don't worry, they're not gimmicky sensors to allow for 3D effects, but are IR sensors used to recognize your hand as you approach or wave over the Moto X (and your face as you look at the display) so it won't go to sleep if you are actively using the phone.

Also on the front are two long, narrow raised grille sections that look like what you find with the front-facing stereo speakers on the Moto G or HTC One M8. Unfortunately, these are not front-facing speakers. The speaker is on bottom and the headset speaker is on the top. However, like the speaker on the original Moto X, the single bottom speaker on the new Moto X is very loud and clear. Even if a manufacturer simply moves back speakers to the front, there is a benefit to the consumer.

The next design element I noticed was the aluminum metal frame that extends around the entire phone. The power and volume buttons on the upper right are made of aluminum with the power button textured so it is easy for you to find and press the button in the dark. The first gen Moto X had an obvious seam and discontinuity between the plastic front and soft touch back. The aluminum edges taper into the glass front and back piece. The aluminum has a soft smooth finish and definitely gives the new Moto X a premium feel.

The frame on the Moto X is part of its new external antenna system with dynamic tuning. This technology is designed so that you get strong cellular connectivity no matter how you hold your phone. I have seen that the signal indicator rarely goes down on the Moto X and cannot wait to test out a T-Mobile version of the Moto X.

Speaking of the back, I am testing out a Verizon LTE model with a bamboo back. The wood backs used on the new Moto X are FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified and both look and feel fantastic. Motorola will also offer four leather back options on the Moto X budget, while the back options also feel great, I do worry a bit about their long term wear. The leather comes from the Horween tannery also located in Chicago. You will still be able to order various color soft-touch backs via Moto Maker.

Also on the back side, the camera has been upgraded to a 13 megapixel model with 4K video capture capability. I took the Moto X on a weekend beach trip and it captured some awesome photos. Unlike the original Moto X that struggles at times, I have had great success with the new Moto X and wouldn't hesitate to use this as my primary phone camera. Around the camera lens, you will find their new ring flash where the LEDs are integrated into the ring. LED flash on phones doesn't add as much as Xenon flash, but is acceptable for some indoor situations.

Below the camera lens and flash, you will find a pronounced dimple on the new Moto X. Last year's Moto X had a subtle dimple that was formed into the back design, much the way the dimple is on this year's Moto G. On the Moto X there is a concave metal area which reminds me of a dime, that has the Motorola logo, but serves no other purpose than to be a place to rest your finger. This is one area that I would have been fine with bringing over directly from the original Moto X.

   Over a month ago
SEND

After rumors and customer demand, Apple has finally given the people what they want: an iPhone 6 with a larger-than-4.5-inch screen. In fact, you'll have a choice of two phones to consider, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus.

The smaller iPhone 6 breaks away from the 4-inch screen of models past and into larger territory, though at 4.7 inches, the iPhone 6 is still smallish by today's standards.

A refreshed Retina display -- Apple's calling it Retina HD -- retains its 326ppi density with a 1, 334x750-pixel resolution. (It's the iPhone 6 Plus that has the higher pixel density on its 1080p HD display.) The iPhone 6's better-than-720p display on a 4.7-inch phone is about right. It's when you get to 5 inches and higher that we generally start seeing 1080p HD and above
Its larger body and more rounded edges make the slim form feel even thinner. While both sizes feel good, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 fits more securely into the palm. Luckily, even if it does feel massive compared to a 4-inch model, iOS 8 does allow a one-handed way to pop to the top of apps and touch parts of the screen that might normally be out of reach
The wafer-like metal design and curved lines feel, in many ways, like previous iPod Touch models and a little like the iPad. The metal HTC One M8 feels bulky by comparison.

Here's another interesting phone feature: glass that curves around the edges of the phone. It isn't the sapphire screen we were hearing about, but it is a slightly different design element. The phone is also slim, at 0.27-inch, or 6.9-millimeters thin, and it comes in three colors: gold, silver, and space gray.

   Over a month ago
SEND

The original Moto X, which debuted last year, was a different breed of smartphone. Rather than trying to build a beast with the best screen and the most horsepower, Motorola focused on the user experience above all else. The result was a phone that was so intelligent and comfortable to use that it almost didn't matter that it was out-gunned in a lot of ways. Well, the 2014 model is here. Not only does it retain that same sublime user experience, it comes out guns blazing.
The first generation Moto X did not have the highest end specs, yet the software experiences made it a compelling device that I continue to use today. Thankfully, the new Moto X has specs comparable to the other flagships while also offering fantastic software experiences.

The first thing you will notice is that the new Moto X grew up in size and now sports a 5.2 inch 1080p display. Motorola did an excellent job in keeping the bezels small so this 5.2 inch display comes with a width the same as the 5-inch Samsung Galaxy S5. Motorola also has reasonable top and bottom bezels so that the length is 140.8 mm, 2 mm shorter than the S5 and about 6 mm shorter than the One M8.

If you pick up a white version of the Moto X you will likely notice three small openings around the display, reminiscent of the IR sensors on the Kindle Fire phone. There is also a fourth in the upper-left corner that is located within an existing opening for other sensors. Don't worry, they're not gimmicky sensors to allow for 3D effects, but are IR sensors used to recognize your hand as you approach or wave over the Moto X (and your face as you look at the display) so it won't go to sleep if you are actively using the phone.

Also on the front are two long, narrow raised grille sections that look like what you find with the front-facing stereo speakers on the Moto G or HTC One M8. Unfortunately, these are not front-facing speakers. The speaker is on bottom and the headset speaker is on the top. However, like the speaker on the original Moto X, the single bottom speaker on the new Moto X is very loud and clear. Even if a manufacturer simply moves back speakers to the front, there is a benefit to the consumer.

The next design element I noticed was the aluminum metal frame that extends around the entire phone. The power and volume buttons on the upper right are made of aluminum with the power button textured so it is easy for you to find and press the button in the dark. The first gen Moto X had an obvious seam and discontinuity between the plastic front and soft touch back. The aluminum edges taper into the glass front and back piece. The aluminum has a soft smooth finish and definitely gives the new Moto X a premium feel.

The frame on the Moto X is part of its new external antenna system with dynamic tuning. This technology is designed so that you get strong cellular connectivity no matter how you hold your phone. I have seen that the signal indicator rarely goes down on the Moto X and cannot wait to test out a T-Mobile version of the Moto X.

Speaking of the back, I am testing out a Verizon LTE model with a bamboo back. The wood backs used on the new Moto X are FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified and both look and feel fantastic. Motorola will also offer four leather back options on the Moto X budget, while the back options also feel great, I do worry a bit about their long term wear. The leather comes from the Horween tannery also located in Chicago. You will still be able to order various color soft-touch backs via Moto Maker.

Also on the back side, the camera has been upgraded to a 13 megapixel model with 4K video capture capability. I took the Moto X on a weekend beach trip and it captured some awesome photos. Unlike the original Moto X that struggles at times, I have had great success with the new Moto X and wouldn't hesitate to use this as my primary phone camera. Around the camera lens, you will find their new ring flash where the LEDs are integrated into the ring. LED flash on phones doesn't add as much as Xenon flash, but is acceptable for some indoor situations.

Below the camera lens and flash, you will find a pronounced dimple on the new Moto X. Last year's Moto X had a subtle dimple that was formed into the back design, much the way the dimple is on this year's Moto G. On the Moto X there is a concave metal area which reminds me of a dime, that has the Motorola logo, but serves no other purpose than to be a place to rest your finger. This is one area that I would have been fine with bringing over directly from the original Moto X.

   Over a month ago
SEND

After rumors and customer demand, Apple has finally given the people what they want: an iPhone 6 with a larger-than-4.5-inch screen. In fact, you'll have a choice of two phones to consider, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus.

The smaller iPhone 6 breaks away from the 4-inch screen of models past and into larger territory, though at 4.7 inches, the iPhone 6 is still smallish by today's standards.

A refreshed Retina display -- Apple's calling it Retina HD -- retains its 326ppi density with a 1, 334x750-pixel resolution. (It's the iPhone 6 Plus that has the higher pixel density on its 1080p HD display.) The iPhone 6's better-than-720p display on a 4.7-inch phone is about right. It's when you get to 5 inches and higher that we generally start seeing 1080p HD and above
Its larger body and more rounded edges make the slim form feel even thinner. While both sizes feel good, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 fits more securely into the palm. Luckily, even if it does feel massive compared to a 4-inch model, iOS 8 does allow a one-handed way to pop to the top of apps and touch parts of the screen that might normally be out of reach
The wafer-like metal design and curved lines feel, in many ways, like previous iPod Touch models and a little like the iPad. The metal HTC One M8 feels bulky by comparison.

Here's another interesting phone feature: glass that curves around the edges of the phone. It isn't the sapphire screen we were hearing about, but it is a slightly different design element. The phone is also slim, at 0.27-inch, or 6.9-millimeters thin, and it comes in three colors: gold, silver, and space gray.

   Over a month ago
SEND